Friday, October 19, 2018 02:23 PM

ALLERGY RESEARCH: TEST PREDICTS OUTCOME OF HAY FEVER THERAPIES

Allergen-specific immunotherapy can make everyday life much more pleasant for allergy sufferers and provide long-term protection against asthma. It is unclear, however, what exactly happens during this treatment. A team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and Helmholtz Zentrum Mnchen investigated the processes taking place in the body over the course of a three-year allergen-specific immunotherapy. The researchers found clues as to why the allergy immunization takes so long and how the chances of success can be determined at a very early stage.

In allergen-specific immunotherapy, once known as hyposensitization, doctors inject patients with the substances that cause allergic reactions, mostly pollen or mite allergen extracts. In the first phase of the therapy, the dose is gradually increased. Once a so-called maintenance dose is reached, the patient receives injections at that dosage over an extended period -- generally three years. If all goes well, there is lasting reduction in the intensity of allergic reactions after the treatment is completed.

It is still unclear what exactly happens in the body during these treatments. A team surrounding Dr. Adam Chaker, the head of the Allergy Outpatient Clinic at the Clinic and Polyclinic for Ear, Nose and Throat Medicine at the the TUM ...

News source: GOOGLE NEWS

See also: Steven Enrich