Tuesday, July 17, 2018 06:50 AM

INSIGHTS INTO NEW CORNEAL SURGERY - MEDICAL XPRESS

Credit: CC0 Public Domain

An innovative vision-restoring procedure performed in Australia for less than 10 years has been reported on in detail for the first time.

It will assist surgeons to make important decisions when using corneal grafts to treat thousands of Australians facing blindness each year.

The findings form part of the 2018 report of Flinders University the Australian Corneal Graft Registry (ACGR), which collects and analyses national data relating to corneal transplants.

An international frontrunner, the registry was established at Flinders in 1985 and has collected data on more than 35,000 graft procedures and enabled many advances to be made in the field of ophthalmology.

Corneal grafting, or keratoplasty, involves the replacement of the front clear 'window' section of the eye with a cornea from a deceased donor.

Corneal damage from genetic conditions, infections or traumatic injuries is one of the major causes of blindness in Australia.

Flinders University Associate Professor Richard Mills, who is Medical Director of the ACGR, says the newer procedure, called Descemet's Membrane Endothelial Keratoplasty, involves replacing only a very thin internal layer of the cornea.

"It requires fewer stitches and is often commended for potentially reduced rates of graft rejection and enabling final vision outcomes to be reached ...

News source: GOOGLE NEWS

See also: EastRidgeEyeCenter