Tuesday, April 03, 2018 10:05 AM

OLDER AMERICANS ARE ‘HOOKED’ ON VITAMINS

The enthusiasm does tend to outpace the evidence, said Dr. JoAnn Manson, chief of preventive medicine at Bostons Brigham and Womens Hospital.

Theres no conclusive evidence[1] that dietary supplements prevent chronic disease in the average American, Dr. Manson said. And while a handful of vitamin and mineral studies[2] have had positive results, those findings havent been strong enough to recommend supplements to the general American public[3], she said.

The National Institutes of Health has spent more than $2.4 billion since 1999 studying vitamins and minerals. Yet for all the research weve done, we dont have much to show for it[4], said Dr. Barnett Kramer, director of cancer prevention at the National Cancer Institute.

In Search Of The Magic Bullet

A big part of the problem, Dr. Kramer said, could be that much nutrition research has been based on faulty assumptions, including the notion that people need more ...

News source: The New York Times

See also: The Robotic Urologist